100 Must Read Books: The Man’s Essential Library | The Art of Manliness

April 29, 2010 at 9:31 am (Uncategorized)

Written by: Jason Lankow, Ross Crooks, Joshua Ritchie, and Brett McKay


Photo by the nonist

There are the books you read, and then there are the books that change your life. We can all look back on the books that have shaped our perspective on politics, religion, money, and love. Some will even become a source of inspiration for the rest of your life. From a seemingly infinite list of books of anecdotal or literal merit, we have narrowed down the top 100 books that have shaped the lives of individual men while also helping define broader cultural ideas of what it means to be a man.
Whether it be a book on adventure, war, or manners, there is so much to learn about life’s great questions from these gems. Let us know in the comments which of these you loved, hated, and the books that meant a lot to you and should have made the list (you can even get really indignant about your favorite book). And without further ado, this is our list.

Amazon Listmania: The Essential Man’s Library Part I

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Set on the East Coast in the roaring 20’s, this American novel is a classic. From it we learn that often the wanting of something is better than actually having it. It is relevant to every man’s life. Furthermore, one true friend is worth infinitely more than a multitude of acquaintances.

“He smiled understandingly-much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles… It faced–or seemed to face–the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor.”

The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli

Considered by most to be the authoritative text on statesmanship and power (how to obtain it as well as an illustration of its trappings), although certainly a shrewd one.

From this arises an argument: whether it is better to be loved than feared. I reply that one should like to be both one and the other; but since it is difficult to join them together, it is much safer to be feared than to be loved when one of the two must be lacking.

Essentially, Machiavelli advocates letting your people have their property and women, but making sure that they know what you are capable of doing if they step out of line.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Through the beloved Billy Pilgrim, we see the central themes of Vonnegut’s humanism along with his satirical take on how disgusting it is when humans don’t use their (limited) free will to prevent simple atrocities. A great example of how we use humor to deal with hardship, and the conflict between the way heroism is conveyed through stories for actions in situations that perhaps could have been avoided altogether.

“So then I understood. It was war that made her so angry. She didn’t want her babies or anybody else’s babies killed in wars. And she thought wars were partly encouraged by books and movies.”

1984 by George Orwell

If you are already worried about the information that your computer is collecting from you, re-read this one and you will feel much better! Or, perhaps, you will throw your computer in a river. This is the classic text for the will of the individual to maintain his privacy and free will, and how easy it is at the end of it all to just try to blend in and go with the flow to avoid making things even worse by speaking out.

“But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.”

The Republic by Plato

Since every man can use a fair portion of philosophy in his literary diet, the origin of legitimate western thought might be a good place to start. Plato’s most well known work breaks down topics of which you should have a fundamental understanding such as government, justice, and political theory.

Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

The final work of Dostoevsky (commonly accepted English spelling of the name) has a lot of meat to chew on…it strikes at the core of who we are and what drives us. Ultimately, for all of our strength and wisdom as individuals, we are often frustrated by our failures to do what we know we must do (or at least think we should do) and need the power of forgiveness in our lives. Many important thinkers consider this to be one of (if not the most) important masterpiece of literature, including Sigmund Freud and Franz Kafka (who did not think quite alike, to say the least).

“So long as man remains free he strives for nothing so incessantly and so painfully as to find some one to worship.”

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Holden Caufield, if nothing else, should serve as a point of reference for the angst and cynicism that you perhaps once had, or ideally never had. If you thought like him when you were 16 or 17 years old, you are forgiven. If you still identify with him, you need to find some more joy, somehow…fake it ’til you make it. Do something.

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

The fundamental work on free market policies: “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own self interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.” Want an education in economics? This book is a great start. (Pictured is the copy that belonged to John Adams).

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Set in the Spanish Civil War, this novel explores who man becomes when faced with the prospect of his own death. It is worthwhile for all of us to consider what we would give our lives for, as this defines what and who we truly love. This is one of the great examples of how war has shaped men, past and present, and has in part defined the image of a true hero who is courageous even when it has brutal consequences.

“You learned the dry-mouthed, fear-purged purging ecstasy of battle and you fought that summer and that fall for all the poor in the world against all tyranny, for all the things you believed in and for the new world you had been educated into.”

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Arguably the best work from the ever-quotable Wilde, this novel is a guide for how to live a life of pure decadence. Packed with impeccable wit, clever one-liners and an excessive amount of egotistical vanity. At the very least, this book will show you the glory and the pitfalls of being the best looking chap around.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

One of the most controversial books of its time, the Joads are “Okies” who head west to the fertile valleys of California during the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s. Because of the social solutions that the book proposed, and its depiction of work camp conditions, some groups attacked the novel as communist propaganda. However, it was widely read as a result of the national attention, and is a classic example of a man doing what he had to do for his family and persevering through all plights and conditions.

“Fear the time when the strikes stop while the great owners live – for every little beaten strike is proof that the step is being taken…fear the time when Manself will not suffer and die for a concept, for this one quality is the foundation of Manself, and this one quality is man, distinctive in the universe.”

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

With a revolutionary and controversial view of the future, Huxley’s satiric take on the “utopia” of tomorrow has provoked reader’s thoughts for decades. Depictions of genetically enhanced embryos predisposed to a specific social class cast warning signs for technological interference with human life.

How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie

This is not a Dr. Phil self-help book. Citing intimate examples from the likes of Rockefeller, Charles Schwab and FDR, this comprehensive guide is all about how to get ahead in business, relationships and life. Read one chapter a day for the rest of your life. It will make you a far better man than you would ever be without it.

Call of the Wild by Jack London

The tale of a domesticated dog forced to adapt to a life of work in Alaska during the Yukon gold rush. Most of us can recall rooting for Buck in the ferocious battle to be the leader of the pack. Make sure that you embrace the benefits of competition to push yourself to become better in your work, but do it without biting and/or killing co-workers.

“…men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal…These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.”

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt shows what made Theodore Roosevelt the great man he was. Reading this book will inspire you to get off the couch and start moving in your life. Harvard graduate, New York Assemblyman, rancher, historian, author of several books, New York City Police Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Governor of New York, and commanding officer of the Rough Riders are all titles that TR had before he became president at 42.

Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss

Every boy can stand to learn a bit of old fashioned resourcefulness from their pops. Finding yourself on a deserted island is surely the way to learn these skills in a hurry. Tree forts, treasure hunting, and constant adventure mark the Swiss Family’s 10 year run. Lesson number one? Shipwrecks make for some good literature.

Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac

An idealistic vision from the man who fueled the Beat Generation, a life on the road without concern for wealth or even stability, rather an enjoyment of surroundings, whatever they may be. This is a great book for reminding us to get away from technology, at least for a day, to appreciate nature and some of the more simple pleasures of life. Don’t feel inferior to the beatniks if you still like driving your car…don’t ever let hipsters give you guilt trips.

“I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long lost, like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream…”

The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer

(2 for 1 special) Though the authorship is disputed, the place of these two epics in the man canon is not. Roughly based around the events of the Trojan War, these poems are likely a great collection of common Greek folklore surrounding the events in those days of fierce political turmoil. It is rumored that there were 10 epics in all, and 8 were lost over time. This may be a blessing in disguise, because, if they were around, you would never get to the rest of this list.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

The logic here is simple: any book which has the influence to have coined terminology commonly used in our society for decades on end should be perused based solely on principle. Nothing is worse than a man being caught using language of which he is unfamiliar with its proper meaning or origin. Also, it is a great book.

Walden by Henry David Thoreau

A bit of isolation never hurt any man. Thoreau spent two years, two months and two days writing this book in Walden, a cabin tucked deep in the woods near Concord, Massachusetts. This work of non-fiction describes the changing of the seasons over the course of a year and was intended to give the author an escape from society in order to achieve a more objective point of view. A real man would take this sabbatical himself, but the book should suffice for those of you who are employed.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Primal instincts. With only the most basic of needs to consider, human nature takes a different approach. A fictional study of the struggle for power and the unspeakable things that man (or child) will do when taken outside the order of civilization.

The Master and Margarita by by Mikhail Bulgakov

There is nothing more manly than a bout with the Devil. An entertaining commentary on the atheistic social bureaucracy in Moscow in the 1930’s wherein Lucifer himself pays the town a visit to make light of their skepticism regarding the spiritual realm.

“As a result he decided to abandon the main thoroughfares and make his way through the side streets and back alleys where people were less nosy, and there was less chance that a barefoot man would be pestered about long johns that stubbornly refused to look like trousers.”

Bluebeard by Kurt Vonnegut

Written as the autobiography of Rabo Karabekian, of course with Vonnegut’s own war experiences drawn upon as inspiration to the aging artist who narrates his own story. It is a hilarious take on abstract art, and takes jabs at both the inflated self-importance of the artist and the people who simply refuse to look beneath the surface.

“My soul knows my meat is doing bad things, and is embarrassed. But my meat just keeps right on doing bad, dumb things.”

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Exploring the “virtue” of living for ourselves, this monster of a book (1,084 pages in my version) is certainly worth plowing through as it is simply a great story. The fundamental concept is that our world falls apart when individuals stop seeking their own satisfaction through personal achievement and feel a sense of entitlement to the accomplishments and work of others. This book challenges us on many levels…you may find it conflicting with your value of other people, her treatment of God, or any other beliefs you already hold. Yet, who can argue with “The most depraved type of human being … (is) the man without a purpose.”

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

Photo by Celeste

As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.

None of us want this to happen. Well, most of us don’t. Kafka employed terms from law and politics, and was always concerned about some vague, oppressive bureaucracy that sought his ruin, though seeming cool and detached. We can take something from the very approach of Kafka to his work and find a balance between reading too much meaning into an event and, on the contrary, caring too little and being completely disillusioned.

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Permalink Leave a Comment

100 Must Read Books: The Man’s Essential Library | The Art of Manliness

April 29, 2010 at 9:30 am (Uncategorized)

Written by: Jason Lankow, Ross Crooks, Joshua Ritchie, and Brett McKay


Photo by the nonist

There are the books you read, and then there are the books that change your life. We can all look back on the books that have shaped our perspective on politics, religion, money, and love. Some will even become a source of inspiration for the rest of your life. From a seemingly infinite list of books of anecdotal or literal merit, we have narrowed down the top 100 books that have shaped the lives of individual men while also helping define broader cultural ideas of what it means to be a man.
Whether it be a book on adventure, war, or manners, there is so much to learn about life’s great questions from these gems. Let us know in the comments which of these you loved, hated, and the books that meant a lot to you and should have made the list (you can even get really indignant about your favorite book). And without further ado, this is our list.

Amazon Listmania: The Essential Man’s Library Part I

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Set on the East Coast in the roaring 20’s, this American novel is a classic. From it we learn that often the wanting of something is better than actually having it. It is relevant to every man’s life. Furthermore, one true friend is worth infinitely more than a multitude of acquaintances.

“He smiled understandingly-much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles… It faced–or seemed to face–the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor.”

The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli

Considered by most to be the authoritative text on statesmanship and power (how to obtain it as well as an illustration of its trappings), although certainly a shrewd one.

From this arises an argument: whether it is better to be loved than feared. I reply that one should like to be both one and the other; but since it is difficult to join them together, it is much safer to be feared than to be loved when one of the two must be lacking.

Essentially, Machiavelli advocates letting your people have their property and women, but making sure that they know what you are capable of doing if they step out of line.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Through the beloved Billy Pilgrim, we see the central themes of Vonnegut’s humanism along with his satirical take on how disgusting it is when humans don’t use their (limited) free will to prevent simple atrocities. A great example of how we use humor to deal with hardship, and the conflict between the way heroism is conveyed through stories for actions in situations that perhaps could have been avoided altogether.

“So then I understood. It was war that made her so angry. She didn’t want her babies or anybody else’s babies killed in wars. And she thought wars were partly encouraged by books and movies.”

1984 by George Orwell

If you are already worried about the information that your computer is collecting from you, re-read this one and you will feel much better! Or, perhaps, you will throw your computer in a river. This is the classic text for the will of the individual to maintain his privacy and free will, and how easy it is at the end of it all to just try to blend in and go with the flow to avoid making things even worse by speaking out.

“But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.”

The Republic by Plato

Since every man can use a fair portion of philosophy in his literary diet, the origin of legitimate western thought might be a good place to start. Plato’s most well known work breaks down topics of which you should have a fundamental understanding such as government, justice, and political theory.

Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

The final work of Dostoevsky (commonly accepted English spelling of the name) has a lot of meat to chew on…it strikes at the core of who we are and what drives us. Ultimately, for all of our strength and wisdom as individuals, we are often frustrated by our failures to do what we know we must do (or at least think we should do) and need the power of forgiveness in our lives. Many important thinkers consider this to be one of (if not the most) important masterpiece of literature, including Sigmund Freud and Franz Kafka (who did not think quite alike, to say the least).

“So long as man remains free he strives for nothing so incessantly and so painfully as to find some one to worship.”

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Holden Caufield, if nothing else, should serve as a point of reference for the angst and cynicism that you perhaps once had, or ideally never had. If you thought like him when you were 16 or 17 years old, you are forgiven. If you still identify with him, you need to find some more joy, somehow…fake it ’til you make it. Do something.

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

The fundamental work on free market policies: “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own self interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.” Want an education in economics? This book is a great start. (Pictured is the copy that belonged to John Adams).

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

Set in the Spanish Civil War, this novel explores who man becomes when faced with the prospect of his own death. It is worthwhile for all of us to consider what we would give our lives for, as this defines what and who we truly love. This is one of the great examples of how war has shaped men, past and present, and has in part defined the image of a true hero who is courageous even when it has brutal consequences.

“You learned the dry-mouthed, fear-purged purging ecstasy of battle and you fought that summer and that fall for all the poor in the world against all tyranny, for all the things you believed in and for the new world you had been educated into.”

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Arguably the best work from the ever-quotable Wilde, this novel is a guide for how to live a life of pure decadence. Packed with impeccable wit, clever one-liners and an excessive amount of egotistical vanity. At the very least, this book will show you the glory and the pitfalls of being the best looking chap around.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

One of the most controversial books of its time, the Joads are “Okies” who head west to the fertile valleys of California during the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s. Because of the social solutions that the book proposed, and its depiction of work camp conditions, some groups attacked the novel as communist propaganda. However, it was widely read as a result of the national attention, and is a classic example of a man doing what he had to do for his family and persevering through all plights and conditions.

“Fear the time when the strikes stop while the great owners live – for every little beaten strike is proof that the step is being taken…fear the time when Manself will not suffer and die for a concept, for this one quality is the foundation of Manself, and this one quality is man, distinctive in the universe.”

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

With a revolutionary and controversial view of the future, Huxley’s satiric take on the “utopia” of tomorrow has provoked reader’s thoughts for decades. Depictions of genetically enhanced embryos predisposed to a specific social class cast warning signs for technological interference with human life.

How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie

This is not a Dr. Phil self-help book. Citing intimate examples from the likes of Rockefeller, Charles Schwab and FDR, this comprehensive guide is all about how to get ahead in business, relationships and life. Read one chapter a day for the rest of your life. It will make you a far better man than you would ever be without it.

Call of the Wild by Jack London

The tale of a domesticated dog forced to adapt to a life of work in Alaska during the Yukon gold rush. Most of us can recall rooting for Buck in the ferocious battle to be the leader of the pack. Make sure that you embrace the benefits of competition to push yourself to become better in your work, but do it without biting and/or killing co-workers.

“…men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal…These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.”

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt shows what made Theodore Roosevelt the great man he was. Reading this book will inspire you to get off the couch and start moving in your life. Harvard graduate, New York Assemblyman, rancher, historian, author of several books, New York City Police Commissioner, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Governor of New York, and commanding officer of the Rough Riders are all titles that TR had before he became president at 42.

Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss

Every boy can stand to learn a bit of old fashioned resourcefulness from their pops. Finding yourself on a deserted island is surely the way to learn these skills in a hurry. Tree forts, treasure hunting, and constant adventure mark the Swiss Family’s 10 year run. Lesson number one? Shipwrecks make for some good literature.

Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac

An idealistic vision from the man who fueled the Beat Generation, a life on the road without concern for wealth or even stability, rather an enjoyment of surroundings, whatever they may be. This is a great book for reminding us to get away from technology, at least for a day, to appreciate nature and some of the more simple pleasures of life. Don’t feel inferior to the beatniks if you still like driving your car…don’t ever let hipsters give you guilt trips.

“I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long lost, like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream…”

The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer

(2 for 1 special) Though the authorship is disputed, the place of these two epics in the man canon is not. Roughly based around the events of the Trojan War, these poems are likely a great collection of common Greek folklore surrounding the events in those days of fierce political turmoil. It is rumored that there were 10 epics in all, and 8 were lost over time. This may be a blessing in disguise, because, if they were around, you would never get to the rest of this list.

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

The logic here is simple: any book which has the influence to have coined terminology commonly used in our society for decades on end should be perused based solely on principle. Nothing is worse than a man being caught using language of which he is unfamiliar with its proper meaning or origin. Also, it is a great book.

Walden by Henry David Thoreau

A bit of isolation never hurt any man. Thoreau spent two years, two months and two days writing this book in Walden, a cabin tucked deep in the woods near Concord, Massachusetts. This work of non-fiction describes the changing of the seasons over the course of a year and was intended to give the author an escape from society in order to achieve a more objective point of view. A real man would take this sabbatical himself, but the book should suffice for those of you who are employed.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Primal instincts. With only the most basic of needs to consider, human nature takes a different approach. A fictional study of the struggle for power and the unspeakable things that man (or child) will do when taken outside the order of civilization.

The Master and Margarita by by Mikhail Bulgakov

There is nothing more manly than a bout with the Devil. An entertaining commentary on the atheistic social bureaucracy in Moscow in the 1930’s wherein Lucifer himself pays the town a visit to make light of their skepticism regarding the spiritual realm.

“As a result he decided to abandon the main thoroughfares and make his way through the side streets and back alleys where people were less nosy, and there was less chance that a barefoot man would be pestered about long johns that stubbornly refused to look like trousers.”

Bluebeard by Kurt Vonnegut

Written as the autobiography of Rabo Karabekian, of course with Vonnegut’s own war experiences drawn upon as inspiration to the aging artist who narrates his own story. It is a hilarious take on abstract art, and takes jabs at both the inflated self-importance of the artist and the people who simply refuse to look beneath the surface.

“My soul knows my meat is doing bad things, and is embarrassed. But my meat just keeps right on doing bad, dumb things.”

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Exploring the “virtue” of living for ourselves, this monster of a book (1,084 pages in my version) is certainly worth plowing through as it is simply a great story. The fundamental concept is that our world falls apart when individuals stop seeking their own satisfaction through personal achievement and feel a sense of entitlement to the accomplishments and work of others. This book challenges us on many levels…you may find it conflicting with your value of other people, her treatment of God, or any other beliefs you already hold. Yet, who can argue with “The most depraved type of human being … (is) the man without a purpose.”

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

Photo by Celeste

As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a monstrous vermin.

None of us want this to happen. Well, most of us don’t. Kafka employed terms from law and politics, and was always concerned about some vague, oppressive bureaucracy that sought his ruin, though seeming cool and detached. We can take something from the very approach of Kafka to his work and find a balance between reading too much meaning into an event and, on the contrary, caring too little and being completely disillusioned.

Pages: 1 2 3 4

Permalink Leave a Comment

30 Awesome Minimalist Superhero Posters – Screen Rant

April 27, 2010 at 6:41 am (Uncategorized)

30 Awesome Minimalist Superhero Posters

We here at Screen Rant wanted to celebrate the upcoming summer movie season – particularly the release of Iron Man 2 – by taking an unconventional look at some of the most iconic superheroes in the entertainment industry.

Over the past few months, you may have caught some of our “SR Picks” which highlighted various artists’ interpretations of Quentin Tarantino films, Star Wars and popular television series. Today, we’re stepping out from solely presenting these wonderful posters

and taking the initiative to create some of our own.

For the past three nights, I put my need for a good night’s sleep aside in order to present you, the reader, with literally dozens of superhero posters with a unique, minimalist twist.

Some may be more obvious than others, but hopefully you’ll have no problem identifying each and every comic-book icon represented. If, for some reason, you’re not a fan of the typical comic book hero (Capes & Cowls), I’ve also thrown in some of my favorite off-beat superhero characters from television’s past.

I apologize in advance if your favorite superhero is not included, but I’m sure with 30 posters to choose from you’ll have no problem finding something to pique your interest. You can click on the posters below for a larger version of each.

Without further ado… Enjoy!















There you have it! Screen Rant’s first foray into the minimalist poster universe.

What did you think of our minimalist superhero posters and which was your favorite? Which superhero would you have liked to see that we might have missed? Would you like to see more of this from us, and if so what other subjects would you like to see get the minimalist treatment? Can you still sing the entire Darkwing Duck theme song?

Make sure to comment below. We’d love to hear what you think.

Follow me on Twitter @anthonyocasio

(Special thanks to fellow Screen Rant writers Mike Eisenberg, for planting the minimalist-idea seed, and Paul Young, for getting equally as little sleep as me in order to help me fully realize and develop the idea – as well as designing the wonderful Aquaman, Hawkeye, Punisher and Thing posters.)

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Permalink Leave a Comment

30 Awesome Minimalist Superhero Posters – Screen Rant

April 27, 2010 at 6:41 am (Uncategorized)

30 Awesome Minimalist Superhero Posters

We here at Screen Rant wanted to celebrate the upcoming summer movie season – particularly the release of Iron Man 2 – by taking an unconventional look at some of the most iconic superheroes in the entertainment industry.

Over the past few months, you may have caught some of our “SR Picks” which highlighted various artists’ interpretations of Quentin Tarantino films, Star Wars and popular television series. Today, we’re stepping out from solely presenting these wonderful posters

and taking the initiative to create some of our own.

For the past three nights, I put my need for a good night’s sleep aside in order to present you, the reader, with literally dozens of superhero posters with a unique, minimalist twist.

Some may be more obvious than others, but hopefully you’ll have no problem identifying each and every comic-book icon represented. If, for some reason, you’re not a fan of the typical comic book hero (Capes & Cowls), I’ve also thrown in some of my favorite off-beat superhero characters from television’s past.

I apologize in advance if your favorite superhero is not included, but I’m sure with 30 posters to choose from you’ll have no problem finding something to pique your interest. You can click on the posters below for a larger version of each.

Without further ado… Enjoy!















There you have it! Screen Rant’s first foray into the minimalist poster universe.

What did you think of our minimalist superhero posters and which was your favorite? Which superhero would you have liked to see that we might have missed? Would you like to see more of this from us, and if so what other subjects would you like to see get the minimalist treatment? Can you still sing the entire Darkwing Duck theme song?

Make sure to comment below. We’d love to hear what you think.

Follow me on Twitter @anthonyocasio

(Special thanks to fellow Screen Rant writers Mike Eisenberg, for planting the minimalist-idea seed, and Paul Young, for getting equally as little sleep as me in order to help me fully realize and develop the idea – as well as designing the wonderful Aquaman, Hawkeye, Punisher and Thing posters.)

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Permalink Leave a Comment

Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda | AMOG

April 23, 2010 at 11:54 pm (Uncategorized)

The First World War was brutal horrible shit. The total casualties, military and civilian, totaled over 37 million people. 21 million people were injured and 16 million died. Many people today seem to forget about how crazy the First World War was because of WW2 and other stuff that has happened since, but believe you me, it was of epic importance. The outcome of the war redrew national boundaries, killed off entire generations of young men, and redefined and destroyed European empires and monarchies.

Soldiers fought in appalling conditions.

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.28.15 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.30.30 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

You could say soldiers were perpetually filthy.

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.32.38 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.33.52 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

While we know how horribly god-awful trench warfare was, as did the leaders in charge at the time, nations utilized patriotism to rally support, sell war bonds, and convince people to enlist. When one looks at WW1 era propaganda, you would never know just how brutal the war actually was. AMOG hopes you enjoy this ghastly compilation.

112 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
212 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
312 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
42 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
52 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


62 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
72 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
82 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
92 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
102 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


113 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
122 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
132 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
142 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
152 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


162 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
172 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
182 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
192 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
202 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


213 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
222 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
232 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
242 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
252 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


262 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
272 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
282 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
292 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
302 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


313 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
322 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
332 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
342 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
352 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


362 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
372 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
382 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
392 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
402 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


411 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
421 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
43 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
44 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
45 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


46 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
47 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
48 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
49 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
50 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.28.15 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.30.30 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.32.38 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.33.52 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


Amazingly rare WW1 footage in COLOR

Footage

Propaganda Stuff

Permalink Leave a Comment

Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda | AMOG

April 23, 2010 at 11:54 pm (Uncategorized)

The First World War was brutal horrible shit. The total casualties, military and civilian, totaled over 37 million people. 21 million people were injured and 16 million died. Many people today seem to forget about how crazy the First World War was because of WW2 and other stuff that has happened since, but believe you me, it was of epic importance. The outcome of the war redrew national boundaries, killed off entire generations of young men, and redefined and destroyed European empires and monarchies.

Soldiers fought in appalling conditions.

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.28.15 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.30.30 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

You could say soldiers were perpetually filthy.

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.32.38 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.33.52 PM Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda

While we know how horribly god-awful trench warfare was, as did the leaders in charge at the time, nations utilized patriotism to rally support, sell war bonds, and convince people to enlist. When one looks at WW1 era propaganda, you would never know just how brutal the war actually was. AMOG hopes you enjoy this ghastly compilation.

112 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
212 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
312 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
42 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
52 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


62 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
72 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
82 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
92 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
102 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


113 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
122 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
132 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
142 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
152 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


162 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
172 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
182 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
192 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
202 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


213 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
222 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
232 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
242 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
252 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


262 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
272 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
282 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
292 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
302 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


313 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
322 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
332 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
342 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
352 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


362 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
372 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
382 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
392 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
402 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


411 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
421 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
43 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
44 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
45 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


46 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
47 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
48 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
49 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
50 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.28.15 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.30.30 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.32.38 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda
Screen shot 2010 04 01 at 5.33.52 PM 90x90 Halt the Hun! Allied First World War Propaganda


Amazingly rare WW1 footage in COLOR

Footage

Propaganda Stuff



Permalink Leave a Comment

14 Things You Might Not Know About The Big Lebowski | The Best Article Every day

April 23, 2010 at 11:43 pm (Uncategorized)

14 Things You Might Not Know About The Big Lebowski

April 21, 2010

Written by brettf123

Not all movies stand the test of time. Viewers have the memory span of goldfish and what’s hot today may soon be forgotten. Cult classics, on the other hand, often become immortal. The Big Lebowski (1998) is such a film. With its quotable lines, zany characters, and dialogue that somehow remains funny no matter how many times you see it, there’s a reason why it’s still being talked about after all these years. As with most cult classics, there are a few hidden quirks in the film that evade even some of its die hard devotees. Also, there are many interesting ways in which fans continue to celebrate the film. After researching both, here is our list of 14 things you might not know about The Big Lebowski.

Lebowski Fest

As with cult classics such as Troll 2 (1990) and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), The Big Lebowski spawned a film festival of its own. Lebowski Fest, which travels accross the country, started in Louisville in 2002 and is currently in its eighth consecutive year. Activities at the event include bowling, costume contests, and trivia. Jeff Bridges, who played “The Dude,” attended one of the events in Los Angeles. The British equivalent to the American festival is called “The Dude Abides” and is held in London.

Reference in Burn After Reading (2008)

<

A reference to The Big Lebowski can be found in a later Coen Brothers’ film, Burn After Reading (2008). In the scene where Chad Feldheimer (Brad Pitt) blackmails Osbourne Cox (John Malkovich), he’s about to shout, “Where is the money, Lebowski!?” before getting punched in the face. A similar shout out can be found in The Big Lebowski. Walter (John Goodman) constantly tells Donny (Steve Buscemi) to “Shut the fuck up!” In the Coen Brothers’ previous film, Fargo (1996), Buscemi’s character wouldn’t stop talking.

Internet Success

The British newspaper, The Independent, credits Lebowski’s popularity, in part, to the influence of the Internet. If not for the web, fans might not have realized that they weren’t alone in their Lebowski worship. According to the paper, the number one comment on lebowskifest.com is, “I’m so happy to find others like me,” or comments of a similar nature.

Lebowski Drinking Game

Different variations exist for this. One of the most memorable and least complicated is to take a drink whenever The Dude does. If he takes a marijuana hit, you do likewise. Good luck making it through.

Walter Sobchak

John Goodman’s acerbic character, Walter Sobchak, was inspired by filmmaker John Milius, who has a love of guns. Screenwriter Lewis Abernathy was another source of inspiration for Walter, and even made an appearance at the Texas Lebowski Fest in Austin.

Asia Carrera Cameo

Former porn-star Asia Carrera makes a brief cameo appearance as one of Bunny’s (Tara Reid) cast mates in the adult movie, LogJammin’.

“The Dude”

Jeff Bridge’s character (The Dude) was inspired by film producer and political activist Jeff Dowd, a friend of the Coen Brothers. Dowd liked to drink White Russians and had a similar moniker. The other source of inspiration came from a Vietnam War veteran, Pete Exine, who had a rug which really “tied the room together.” Several of his personal stories were taken by the Coen Brothers wholesale. He had his car stolen by a high school student and found it impounded with an 8th grader’s homework on the floor.

Mawd

According to Julianne Moore, her character, Maude, was inspired by the likes of artist Carolee Schneemann who liked to work naked from a swing. Yoko Ono was another source of inspiration. This isn’t surprising given her peculiar nature.

Narrative Influences

The movie’s overall narrative structure was influence by the detective fiction of Raymond Chandler. As Ethan Coen said, “We wanted something that would generate a certain narrative feeling – like a modern Raymond Chandler story, and that’s why it had to be set in Los Angeles … We wanted to have a narrative flow, a story that moves like a Chandler book through different parts of town and different social classes.”

Books

The Big Lebowski has its share of literature devoted to the film’s production as well as critical analysis. Some examples include I’m a Lebowski, You’re a Lebowski, The Dude Abides: The Gospel According to the Coen Brothers, and The Year’s Work in Lebowski Studies.

Documentary

The Big Lebowski has spawned its own documentary titled The Achievers: The Story of the Lebowski Fans. The film tries to better understand why Lebowski has made such a splash. Former philosophy student, Eddie Chung, takes the helm and offers a deep take on the cult hit’s impact. Not bad for a film that lasted only 6 weeks in theaters.

Word Usage

According to IMDB, the f-word and its variations are used 294 times, and “dude” is said 161 times. The Dude also utters “man” 147 times, around 1.5 times per minute. Some fans have too much time on their hands.

Landmarks

Since it takes place in Los Angeles, several local landmarks are shown throughout the movie. The bowling alley in the film was formerly the Holly Star Lanes in Santa Monica and the 101 Freeway exit ramp even makes an appearance. The fast food chain featured, In ‘n Out Burger, is indigenous to Southern California. And let’s not forget The Dude’s favorite supermarket chain, Ralphs.

The Dude’s apartment, located in Venice, has become somewhat of a landmark of its own. But if you pay a visit, don’t knock on the door. It’s a private residence, man.

September 11th Prediction?

At the beginning of the film, The Dude stops at a Ralph’s supermarket to pick up some cream for his White Russians. Although the item is less than a dollar, The Dude is forced to write a check. The check is dated, September 11th, 1991, exactly ten years to the day of the World Trade Center attacks. What makes the scene even more peculiar is that while The Dude is writing the check, President Bush (41) can be seen on television discussing tensions in the Middle East while uttering the phrase, “This aggression will not stand.” Foreshadowing? Probably not. But it is an odd coincidence.

Bonus: What do you mean by 420


Source:Tahran Chowdhury

Permalink Leave a Comment

14 Things You Might Not Know About The Big Lebowski | The Best Article Every day

April 23, 2010 at 11:42 pm (Uncategorized)

14 Things You Might Not Know About The Big Lebowski

April 21, 2010

Written by brettf123

Not all movies stand the test of time. Viewers have the memory span of goldfish and what’s hot today may soon be forgotten. Cult classics, on the other hand, often become immortal. The Big Lebowski (1998) is such a film. With its quotable lines, zany characters, and dialogue that somehow remains funny no matter how many times you see it, there’s a reason why it’s still being talked about after all these years. As with most cult classics, there are a few hidden quirks in the film that evade even some of its die hard devotees. Also, there are many interesting ways in which fans continue to celebrate the film. After researching both, here is our list of 14 things you might not know about The Big Lebowski.

Lebowski Fest

As with cult classics such as Troll 2 (1990) and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), The Big Lebowski spawned a film festival of its own. Lebowski Fest, which travels accross the country, started in Louisville in 2002 and is currently in its eighth consecutive year. Activities at the event include bowling, costume contests, and trivia. Jeff Bridges, who played “The Dude,” attended one of the events in Los Angeles. The British equivalent to the American festival is called “The Dude Abides” and is held in London.

Reference in Burn After Reading (2008)

<

A reference to The Big Lebowski can be found in a later Coen Brothers’ film, Burn After Reading (2008). In the scene where Chad Feldheimer (Brad Pitt) blackmails Osbourne Cox (John Malkovich), he’s about to shout, “Where is the money, Lebowski!?” before getting punched in the face. A similar shout out can be found in The Big Lebowski. Walter (John Goodman) constantly tells Donny (Steve Buscemi) to “Shut the fuck up!” In the Coen Brothers’ previous film, Fargo (1996), Buscemi’s character wouldn’t stop talking.

Internet Success

The British newspaper, The Independent, credits Lebowski’s popularity, in part, to the influence of the Internet. If not for the web, fans might not have realized that they weren’t alone in their Lebowski worship. According to the paper, the number one comment on lebowskifest.com is, “I’m so happy to find others like me,” or comments of a similar nature.

Lebowski Drinking Game

Different variations exist for this. One of the most memorable and least complicated is to take a drink whenever The Dude does. If he takes a marijuana hit, you do likewise. Good luck making it through.

Walter Sobchak

John Goodman’s acerbic character, Walter Sobchak, was inspired by filmmaker John Milius, who has a love of guns. Screenwriter Lewis Abernathy was another source of inspiration for Walter, and even made an appearance at the Texas Lebowski Fest in Austin.

Asia Carrera Cameo

Former porn-star Asia Carrera makes a brief cameo appearance as one of Bunny’s (Tara Reid) cast mates in the adult movie, LogJammin’.

“The Dude”

Jeff Bridge’s character (The Dude) was inspired by film producer and political activist Jeff Dowd, a friend of the Coen Brothers. Dowd liked to drink White Russians and had a similar moniker. The other source of inspiration came from a Vietnam War veteran, Pete Exine, who had a rug which really “tied the room together.” Several of his personal stories were taken by the Coen Brothers wholesale. He had his car stolen by a high school student and found it impounded with an 8th grader’s homework on the floor.

Mawd

According to Julianne Moore, her character, Maude, was inspired by the likes of artist Carolee Schneemann who liked to work naked from a swing. Yoko Ono was another source of inspiration. This isn’t surprising given her peculiar nature.

Narrative Influences

The movie’s overall narrative structure was influence by the detective fiction of Raymond Chandler. As Ethan Coen said, “We wanted something that would generate a certain narrative feeling – like a modern Raymond Chandler story, and that’s why it had to be set in Los Angeles … We wanted to have a narrative flow, a story that moves like a Chandler book through different parts of town and different social classes.”

Books

The Big Lebowski has its share of literature devoted to the film’s production as well as critical analysis. Some examples include I’m a Lebowski, You’re a Lebowski, The Dude Abides: The Gospel According to the Coen Brothers, and The Year’s Work in Lebowski Studies.

Documentary

The Big Lebowski has spawned its own documentary titled The Achievers: The Story of the Lebowski Fans. The film tries to better understand why Lebowski has made such a splash. Former philosophy student, Eddie Chung, takes the helm and offers a deep take on the cult hit’s impact. Not bad for a film that lasted only 6 weeks in theaters.

Word Usage

According to IMDB, the f-word and its variations are used 294 times, and “dude” is said 161 times. The Dude also utters “man” 147 times, around 1.5 times per minute. Some fans have too much time on their hands.

Landmarks

Since it takes place in Los Angeles, several local landmarks are shown throughout the movie. The bowling alley in the film was formerly the Holly Star Lanes in Santa Monica and the 101 Freeway exit ramp even makes an appearance. The fast food chain featured, In ‘n Out Burger, is indigenous to Southern California. And let’s not forget The Dude’s favorite supermarket chain, Ralphs.

The Dude’s apartment, located in Venice, has become somewhat of a landmark of its own. But if you pay a visit, don’t knock on the door. It’s a private residence, man.

September 11th Prediction?

At the beginning of the film, The Dude stops at a Ralph’s supermarket to pick up some cream for his White Russians. Although the item is less than a dollar, The Dude is forced to write a check. The check is dated, September 11th, 1991, exactly ten years to the day of the World Trade Center attacks. What makes the scene even more peculiar is that while The Dude is writing the check, President Bush (41) can be seen on television discussing tensions in the Middle East while uttering the phrase, “This aggression will not stand.” Foreshadowing? Probably not. But it is an odd coincidence.

Bonus: What do you mean by 420


Source:Tahran Chowdhury

Permalink Leave a Comment

2010-04-06 19.48.27.jpg

April 7, 2010 at 6:11 am (Uncategorized)

Permalink Leave a Comment

2010-04-06 19.48.27.jpg

April 7, 2010 at 6:10 am (Uncategorized)

Pic_pmz_m

Permalink Leave a Comment

Next page »